There’s an art to creating sales email sequences that both engage and convert. Structure a sequence well, and it can be a cornerstone of customer engagement. The question is, what content should you include in these sequences? Should they focus on maximizing conversions, or could you lean toward education and information?

The sales email sequence examples we explore in this article are snapshots of longer campaigns. These are campaigns that are strategically timed so that the email content is relevant and informative to the recipient. 

The emails all have some aspects in common. They deliver some form of value to the recipient. That value could come in the form of education. Some offer limited-time discounts. Others introduce new products or services.

Each email also has the aim of building relationships. The creators know that in order to turn recipients into loyal customers, they need to nurture and develop a connection. Then, when they’re ready, a reader can follow through on a call to action and become a customer.

  • Using education to position as a trusted authority.
  • Offering exclusive discounts and limited-time offers.
  • Delivering relevant information to recipients.

4 Sales Email Sequence Examples

These sales email sequence examples are a pick from our inbox. They’re all from sales sequences that we’re part of and can learn from. It’s a mixture of direct and indirect sales tactics. Each with the aim of connecting with a customer and hopefully converting them.

Good Pair Days: Building Education

email sequence ideas

Once you’ve signed up to the Good Pair Days mailing list, you’re entered into their education and promotion email sequence. Wine enthusiasts receive regular weekly wine updates. The updates include pairing information, history, and production notes.

This is a great example of sales through education. Note that there are very subtle calls to action but not in the typical sales email style. They are presented in a website menu-style system so that you barely remember that you’re reading an email.

The informal, conversational style makes it feel as though the sender is having a casual chat with you. It’s almost as if a friend is making recommendations to you.

good pairings wine

Another email in the sequence reads more like a newsletter. They offer bitesize pieces of education for people with a genuine interest in wine. The quick bullet points and approachable emoji use allow users to understand the value of the email at a glance.

Again, there’s very little sales speak here. Instead, Good Pair Days opts to sell through education.

Bolt: Exclusive Discounts

rideshare email

Bolt is a ride-sharing and taxi app similar to Uber. They regularly offer their customers limited time, exclusive discounts. In this example, they offer 30% off the rider’s next five trips. For someone who is a regular user, this is a substantial discount. It’s also persuasive for those who might have swapped back to a rival app.

The call to action is as simple as opening the app. You’re not asked to immediately purchase or book a ride. You must open the app, and your code will be applied. This might not, at first, seem like a sales conversion, but it’s psychologically powerful. By opening the app, you’re reminded that it exists, and it gives Bolt data through your use.

Alongside the promotion, Bolt offers information on safety and links to their blog content for recipients to read more.

Similarweb: Informative

On the face of it, this isn’t a sales email at all. Here, Similarweb is signposting you toward the winners of the fastest-growing digital companies as found by the D100. The D100 is an award program that Similarweb has created based on data they have found.

For business owners, this is a fascinating read. It’s not dissimilar to the Forbes Rich List. Everyone likes to investigate success so that they can plan their own.

The CTAs are inviting and certainly have a low impact on the recipient. Similarweb isn’t trying to sell a product or service directly. Rather, they are trying to build a relationship with recipients by positioning themselves as a trusted authority in the space. Once that relationship is built, recipients are far more likely to purchase packages with Similarweb.

Côte Restaurants: Limited Time Discounts

Many restaurants will make use of limited-time discounts, especially during historically quieter seasons such as January. This example is a far more direct, actionable sales email. It cuts straight to the point and shares the value proposition, followed by two different calls to action.

The first call to action is the primary conversion opportunity. The email aims to get recipients to book a table. The second is more informative. It is hoped that following a quick cursory glance over the menu, the recipient will be persuaded to book.

There is no fixed sales email sequence here. It is treated like a newsletter for the entire mailing list. It misses personalization opportunities but does appeal to the majority of recipients. As winter turns to spring, the email content is updated to reflect the passing of the seasons. This ensures that content is both interesting and relevant to the recipients.

Key Takeaways

These sales email sequence examples show the different approaches that you could take. Each is an attempt to connect with their audience. No matter the content that you put into your sales emails, the important aspect is to always have the recipient in mind. Don’t focus solely on the conversion. Look to forge a deeper connection.

  • Make sure that your emails are timed strategically so that they have the highest chance of being read.
  • Always try to deliver value to your recipients.
  • Clear and compelling CTAs will maximize your conversion rates.

For your sequences to be successful, you need to use extensive automation and audience segmentation.

How can you achieve this? By using a tool that you can rely on. Instantly is that tool. See for yourself. Start today.